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CEWD Welcomes Kristie Kelley as Director of Workforce Development

Headshot of Kristie Kelley

Kristie Kelley, an experienced workforce development veteran, has been selected as CEWD’s Director of Workforce Development, effective February 1.

In this new role, Kelley will assume responsibilities for the Energy Industry Fundamentals program, including its revitalization to ensure its reach to 500,000 students in the next 10 years; managing the industry’s efforts to assess re-skilling, upskilling, and training needs for energy jobs of the future; strengthening connections with students and educators; and primary support for CEWD’s members in the west and mid-west, among other things.

Kelley will draw from her leadership as an educator, workforce development specialist, and former energy workforce consortia manager when she assumes the new position. She brings over twenty years of experience in education and workforce and economic development in the energy sector. Kelley currently serves as the Executive Director for both the Central Gulf Industrial Alliance and for the Escambia County Public Schools Foundation. Prior to that, she spent 17 years with the Gulf Power Company in a host of roles that enabled her to impact the workforce development pipeline throughout Florida.

“Kristie will be an incredible asset to our team as we work to ensure a skilled, diverse energy workforce,” emphasized Missy Henriksen, CEWD’s Executive Director. “It is now more important than ever that we connect with students and those who influence them,” continued Henriksen. “Kristie’s experience in establishing career academies, familiarity with the Career and Technical Education system, experience as an educator, and in promoting energy careers is exactly what we need at this time to ensure we are connecting with students from cradle to career.”  

Kelley echoed enthusiasm for the responsibilities before her. “Sometimes it feels as if your life’s journey has prepared you for and guided you to a particular professional opportunity. This is exactly how I feel about working with CEWD and supporting the execution of its workforce development agenda. I am eager to work with CEWD’s members, consortia leaders, volunteers, and the CEWD staff in ensuring a pool, not puddle, of talent.”  

CEWD recently shared its aggressive 2022 workplan priorities, including those that will harness the power of the industry working in a unified fashion to address the most significant issues before us.

CEWD Welcomes Kristie Kelley as Director of Workforce Development

Kristie Kelley, an experienced workforce development veteran, has been selected as CEWD’s Director of Workforce Development, effective February 1.

In this new role, Kelley will assume responsibilities for the Energy Industry Fundamentals program, including its revitalization to ensure its reach to 500,000 students in the next 10 years; managing the industry’s efforts to assess re-skilling, upskilling, and training needs for energy jobs of the future; strengthening connections with students and educators; and primary support for CEWD’s members in the west and mid-west, among other things.

Kelley will draw from her leadership as an educator, workforce development specialist, and former energy workforce consortia manager when she assumes the new position. She brings over twenty years of experience in education and workforce and economic development in the energy sector. Kelley currently serves as the Executive Director for both the Central Gulf Industrial Alliance and for the Escambia County Public Schools Foundation. Prior to that, she spent 17 years with the Gulf Power Company in a host of roles that enabled her to impact the workforce development pipeline throughout Florida.

“Kristie will be an incredible asset to our team as we work to ensure a skilled, diverse energy workforce,” emphasized Missy Henriksen, CEWD’s Executive Director. “It is now more important than ever that we connect with students and those who influence them,” continued Henriksen. “Kristie’s experience in establishing career academies, familiarity with the Career and Technical Education system, experience as an educator, and in promoting energy careers is exactly what we need at this time to ensure we are connecting with students from cradle to career.”  

Kelley echoed enthusiasm for the responsibilities before her. “Sometimes it feels as if your life’s journey has prepared you for and guided you to a particular professional opportunity. This is exactly how I feel about working with CEWD and supporting the execution of its workforce development agenda. I am eager to work with CEWD’s members, consortia leaders, volunteers, and the CEWD staff in ensuring a pool, not puddle, of talent.”  

CEWD recently shared its aggressive 2022 workplan priorities, including those that will harness the power of the industry working in a unified fashion to address the most significant issues before us.